January 22, 2013

A Clearing for Healthier Living

Just in case you need to declutter and reorganize your physical environment, here's a recent Huff Post live provocative discussion with Marc Lamont Hill and Justin Klosky, founder and creative director of O.C.D. (as in organize, create, discipline), he does has obsessive-compulsive disorder. Klosky is channeling the energy of his condition to help those in need, find a healthy clearing in their lives.  The segment offers a candid view of what clutter looks like in real-time exploring the overspill into our lives and relationships. Take a look at the clip:



I need to work through "organized chaos" syndrome meaning I have too many unnecessary things in my life that I have packed away, but can find easily. I'm tenacious so I tend to hold on instead of letting go. I'm also eager to adopt "purge events" in my schedule as psychologist and organizational expert Dr. Melissa Gratias described in the segment.  I'm starting now with the "100 Thing Challenge" by getting rid of 100 old, unused and/or not worth keeping items. I'm starting with stuff that I can put out on the trash in time for this week's garbage collection or in some cases donate.

Finding order in your own life can be overwhelming.  Demanding schedules can move us away from routines that actually make our lives more efficient. Sometimes you may feel like you are waiting for someone else to come along and clean up the daily mess and disorder you make at home, work, in the car, inside a purse, gym bag or knapsack.  Unfinished projects can leave books and papers waiting to be put away.  A quick change of clothes for an evening venue leaves pants, shoes or accessories in a tumble spread across a room.  Who makes their own bed? What does that do? There's an emotional reward to coming home after a long day to order, to sitting down to write at a clear desk, to cooking breakfast in a clean kitchen, to finding items in an organized closet, which like the garage, basement or home office could be stand alone weekend project.

Furthermore, cleaning up in the aftermath of natural disasters (like super storm Sandy), recovering from an illness, transitions and life disruptions can create a new opportunity to declutter and organize your space as well as transform your life.

One of my desktop workspaces on a cleaner day.
"Detecting the Discomforts in Your LIfe" is another strategy to consider, organizational expert Brook Palmer pushes life questions to help remove clutter and disorder by searching for the uncomfortable places and spaces where change can means better living.  His books, the Clutter Busting: Letting Go of What's Holding You Back (New World Library, 2009) and Clutter Busting Your Life: Clearing Physical and Emotional Clutter to Reconnect With Yourself and Others (New World Library, 2012) may offer more insight. 

What's your take? Are you organizing your space? Our lives do need some order, we do work better and live healthier in clean and clear spaces.  You'll have to decide what to address every day, weekly, monthly and other intervals on your calender. Try adding 10-15 minutes to your every day schedule to take out the trash, put clothes away, and/or clear up your desktop. Regular clean up intervals can over time add to your sense well-being whatever your organizational approach. Also be sure to get creative, have fun, play some good music and get it done.
 
Talk is cheap so look for my update by the end of the week. In getting rid of the old! I am making making room for the new and also hope to find a few of my favorite things.  My effort will begin with my physical space(s), next phase will be cleaning up my digital life.  Let me know what's working (or not working) in your environment.

                                                                                                         Again, happy new year.





January 15, 2013

ICYMI: Soul Food Junkies

There is a national dialogue about the persistent health struggles and growing epidemic of obesity across America.  "Soul Food Junkies" offers a provocative glimpse of culture from generations of African Americans at dinner tables and other feasts as well as every day food choices.  Join the conversation/weigh-in.

Watch here:


Watch Soul Food Junkies on PBS. See more from Independent Lens.
There was an error in this gadget

Followers